Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month.

Making up for lost time; a double dose of wonderful and marvellous pieces, scouted on our travels.

Clockwise from left: 18th Century French high back Canapé sofa | All Sew square pendant by Rich Brilliant Willing | Art Deco brass desk lamp, 1935 | Mustard pinstripe throw by Ferm Living.

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

Clockwise from left: Jesmonite candlesticks by Malgorzata Bany | French Art Deco cabinet, 1940s | Danish Love seat, 1940s | Kufic by Lee Krasner, 1965.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - Vermillion. A balanced partnership of red and orange pigments, it’s a colour that asks to be seen. Small doses work wonderfully well, be it a standalone object or upholstered piece. Pair it with neutral materials - light oak, pale sheepskin, tactile linen - to keep the feeling fresh and welcoming. Layer it with jewel-like brights for greater impact.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - Olive. The versatile friend. It partner’s well with just about anything. Easy and timeless, it’s a true understated classic. Equally at home in a fifth floor Barbican apartment or gracing a relaxed nook of a country kitchen. Opt for matt-finish tiles on walls or floors, or intricate Indian block-prints for curtains and upholstery.

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

To make up for the late winter journal lull, and a recent flurry of sourcing - April’s We Like comes early!

Clockwise from left: Encaustic tile by Granby Works | Vintage wicker screen | Swedish brass candle holders by Pierre Forsell for Sultana, 1960s | Vintage French calvados jug.

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

Perhaps it’s the Springtime sunshine or the plentiful blossom lining our street. Maybe it’s the lime green shoots punctuating the beds; either way we are feeling fresh and enlivened by the colours of the new season.

Clockwise from left: SS03 pendant by Naomi Paul | ‘Soleil’ Hobnail pitcher by Pentreath Hall | Grid table in tribute to SuperStudio ‘Quaderna’ | Colonnato table by Mario Bellini for Cassina, 1977.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - Silver. At once workaday and eye-catching. Both humble and hardworking, a timeless presence, gaining character over time. Equally happy as the centre of attention, offering a flirtatious glint; something special. There is always a place for silver in all it’s forms be it aluminium, steel or sterling.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - Cornflower blue; fresh, light, icy almost. This calming colour is both clean and understated. It doesn’t shout for attention, instead it is subtly solid. A timeless shade and a happy partner of any number of colour combinations.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - Navy; the inkiest of blues. Rich with pigment, this colour is deep and enveloping. It invites the viewer in for closer inspection. Both hardworking and adaptable, this tone lends itself to a host of environments.

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

Clockwise from left: Tivoli Lollipop cup by Normann Copenhagen | Stoff Nagel brass candleholder by Werner Stoff, 1960s | Sconce wall light by Kalmer Franken KG, 1960s | Dining chair by Martin Eisler & Carlo Hauner, 1955.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - monochrome. Black and white; wonderfully graphic and smart. At once calming and structured, a pleasing counterbalance between the two stark opposites. The pairing can create a bold statement or bring a touch of elegance. Great for hallways and bathrooms, and when combined with softer tones, it forms a sturdy backbone to any interior scheme.

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

Clockwise from left: Cleopatra Daybed by Dick Cordmeijer, 1960s | Spitz salt and pepper grinder by Martino Gamper, 2014 | Disc pendant chandelier by Gino Vistosi, 1960s | Cork table lamp by Ingo Maurer, 1974.

Series: Colour code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - raw umber. Rich and earthy, almost velvety in its appearance. Best combined with lighter tones to keep the balance, it’s a useful and unexpected alternative to black or navy with a calming nod to nature and organic matter.

Series: Colour Code


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Often the starting point for an inspiring interior scheme is a colour. Colour can really make an impression on a space whether used in moderation or with great gusto. Each approach can set the tone of a room, whether work, rest or play. It can be used to draw attention to certain aspects of an environment creating a focal point, or delicately, bringing a sense of harmony and rhythm. Accent colour can help a scheme feel unified and a dynamic play with two or more colours can bring each one to life. 

Our Colour Code series takes a look at interesting tones and hues; the 'new' discoveries that pique our interest, their complementary counterparts and those go-to shades we fondly rely upon. 

This month on the stopping place - rust. Think Autumnal leaves, terracotta pots and auburn hair caught in the sun. A sophisticated and warm colour with lots of depth. One that works wonderfully well on it’s own for maximum impact or combined with other colours for vibrancy. 

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

Clockwise from left: Crisp sconce by Rich Brilliant Willing | Vex pendant by Naomi Paul | Stoneware mug by H&M Home | Robusta chair in palm by La Pecera Mallorca.

Series: In residence with Carlotta de Bevilacqua

In residence steps inside the homes of some of the worlds greatest artists, designers and architects. The inspiring NOWNESS series explores what home means to these figures and how they live within the spaces that they have created. 

This week the stopping place explores the eclectic and soulful home of Italian architect Carlotta de Bevilacqua in the heart of Milan. Directed by Dael Poulter. 

Series: We like


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A round up of all things art and design related that have caught the eye of the stopping place this month. 

Clockwise from left: Wrapped Book by Christo, 1973 | 232G lamp by Gino Sarfatti, 1961 | Kelly cushion by Linum | 1748 Armchairs by Hvidt and Molgaard, 1940s.